Tag Archives: Petroleum Problems

Petroleum Problems

I try to make it a point to avoid the news. Beyond whatever headlines catch my attention when I log on each day, I ignore the reports of hardships and sorrows the world over. I have enough right here that I fail miserably at dealing with, I really don’t need to try to take on the rest of the world’s problems. Even when I was told that BP turned away aid from others, I chose to be silent in my dissatisfaction. Enough is enough though.

I owned my own business, I understand that, in order to maintain any business, one must be cost efficient. The bigger the business, the more decisions must be weighed against the good of the company verses over-all good. If the company fails, there is more than the owners or shareholders out of a livelihood. When it comes to a business involved in current technology, such as the fuel for the cars Americans cannot figure out how to use responsibly, decisions have more variables to consider. The same people who are complaining about protecting the wildlife, are going to be complaining later about the high price of the fuel they use to get to their rallies. It becomes imperative to weigh the effects of cost and time through the course of normal business.

But there is also a responsibility in conducting business. It may have been legal for me to put whips and chains in the front window of my lingerie store located in a small town with Southern sensibilities, and it may have even been good for business with the kinds of secret lives people lead, but it wouldn’t have been a good choice. It likely would have made me more money, if only because controversy creates advertisement, but it would not have served the greater good of the community itself.

Maybe it’s easier for one person to make a good choice than it is for a corporation like BP. There are a great many people who have to think like-minded all at once, which is often a problem in any environment. Corporate responsibility, not that of the corporation itself, but the responsibility of each individual within the corporation to the corporation, can cloud judgment. The individual finds themselves attempting to adhere to a set of corporate objectives that were written, not for a specific situation, but to cover many different types of decisions. Often those include a primary objective of being fiscally responsible. Even safety is more about not increasing the company’s insurance over insuring the health and well-fare of it’s individuals.

Perhaps that is why the officials at BP made such serious errors in judgment. IN spite of several quotes from various records revealed throughout the investigation, the problems of this spill cannot be laid upon one person. We all know that one person can stand up against what they know to be wrong, and can risk their job-their family’s well-being-to do the “Right” thing. That’s a tough call to make, and in this uncertain economy, a dangerous one.

So who is responsible then? The company. Just like H & S and Wal-mart being held responsible for the destruction of unsold seasonal clothing several months ago, I am holding BP directly responsible for this disaster. There should be no question of cost; absolutely everything that can be done, should be done to rectify this situation. If they cannot, the American government should step in, even inviting known terrorists to participate in this clean up if they are available and willing. Life isn’t nice and neat; sometimes you have to lie with the enemy to serve a greater order.

Serving the greater order also means holding others responsible for their actions. There is sure to be no end to the twists and turns revealed in the investigation, and it is just as probable that it will be continued beyond necessity. I have seen enough myself to have assurances that the company British Petroleum, neglected reasonable suggestions by individuals with appropriate knowledge, contributing to the current disaster. They are also unwilling to accept this responsibility as well as unable to resolve the issue. The American government should immediately stop all BP drilling on American lands and give them a set time to remove their drilling equipment before confiscation. Will this create a diplomatic issue? Only if the British government decides to be unreasonable. BP is a company, not a country.

Not that I expect the US government to take my advice. I do, however, expect the American people to do so. Our government is only as good as the individuals who support it. If you continue to purchase anything from BP, you are supporting their position. Do you really believe they are doing their best effort to clean up their mess, or do you think they are trying to save their butts? Do you believe they could have prevented such a catastrophe by listening to the advice of their own people, or do you support fiscal responsibility above the environment? There is a balance to all things, but that doesn’t mean it is always even. The scale has been tipped in a way I find unacceptable, and I intend to do something about it instead of just complain. What’s your stand?